So, here’s a small video preview of how the dungeon editor works. In the video I go over the basic functionality of the editor and show off some of its features and try to produce at least partially intelligible English with my mandibles.

We can’t wait to see what you can come up with when you can get to work with the editor! Also in other news, we were nominated in the Best European Indie Game category at European Games Award and the entry with the most votes wins and we still have a chance to catch up with Minecraft’s votes! You know what to do!

Oh, and one more thing: as you might’ve noticed this and previous weeks’ updates have been on Wednesdays. This is because so we won’t always have a late Friday panic when everyone is trying to switch into weekend mode while there’s still some blogging to do! We’re gonna try out this schedule for a while and see how it goes. :)

PS. Today I learned that making screencasts is hard work.

  73 Responses to “Dungeon Editor Sneak Peek”

  1. Hello! I’m at work browsing your blog from my new iphone 3gs! Just wanted to say I love reading through your blog and look forward to all your posts! Carry on the great work!

  2. The dungeon editor looks fantastic. I especially like painting passages straight onto the map!

    A suggestion for the preview function: I’d like to be able to place monsters but then walk around the map freely without them getting in the way. You could call it a ghost preview mode, so monsters appear as outlines but I can walk straight through them. Otherwise, we’ll have to either leave monsters until last (not very flexible), or delete them every time we want to experiment with puzzle design.

    Also, please think about how best to use item lists. I’m never going to need the full list of items, since I can only select one item at a time, so having different tabs for each type of item would be useful, as well as subfilters (eg: just swords). Also, I shouldn’t need to remember that “iron_key” is the item I need to open a lock; I should be presented with a list of possible items to use as a key. That list might be cascading: start with common items for the purpose (keys), but allow access to other item types for unusual situations.

    I’d love to create levels in Grimrock! But my experience tells me I’ll only persist (like many people) if the editor GUI doesn’t have too many annoyances. For example, I never completed my Dark Forces levels because it took too long to texture the walls, no matter how much fun it was to create geometry.

    I really hope this helps!

    Good luck.

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